Nigeria In Intense Pain And Struggle?

Nigeria-flagONLY those who lack perception will not know by now that the undertakers of Nigeria have finished their task. Nigeria is in trouble. The day self-serving lawmakers shot down devolution of powers in our Senate with the Representatives following suit, they snuffed out what holds a country together and unleashed what causes its death.
For the first time in the history of Nigeria an unusual cry came out of Yorubaland that has never called for dismemberment of Nigeria in spite of being recipient of piles of injustices from Awo’s travails to Abiola’s liquidation. The Yoruba nation has always asked for justice and the remaking of Nigeria in all its trials in this land of iniquity.
The Yoruba Liberation Command, YOLICOM, called a press conference at the International Press Centre (not just a faceless press release) to announce that the restructuring demand that the region has been famous for since the days of Awo has become irrelevant and what the moment demands is a sovereign Oduduwa Republic.
Nigeria
If Nigeria were not destined to die,it should have been jolted by such a declaration coming from any group in a region whose moderate posture in most situations has made the uninformed to conclude that it is peopled by “cowards” in spite of “wetie” and five years standoff against the annulment of June 12, 1993 elections.
I have written elsewhere that the day the Yoruba begin to ask for the dismemberment of Nigeria, the sun is about to set for the contraption. It is happening before our very eyes but those whose career destiny appears to be the supervision of the dissolution of Nigeria can choose to ignore such a development at the greatest peril of the Republic.
Tyler Durden has done some studies on how a country dies and his findings are very revealing of the season Nigeria lives in. Before him, Ernest Hemingway’s response to a bankruptcy question is very apt to note:
How did your country die? Two ways. Gradually, then suddenly.
A country dies slowly.

Durden says Countries don’t have genetically determined life spans. Nor do they die quickly, unless the cataclysm of some great war does them in. Even in such extreme cases, there are usually warning signs, which are more obvious in hindsight than at the time.
Few citizens of a dying nation recognise the signs. Most are too busy trying to live their lives, sometimes not an easy task. If death occupies their minds, it is with respect to themselves, a relative or a friend. Most cannot conceive of the death of a nation ?the signs or symptoms that precede death for a country often as they do for a person has a pattern that involves the following:
1.The Economy:
Economically, people become poorer. It becomes harder to feed a family. Economic growth stalls and then reverses. Work opportunities decline. It is laughable when NASS says it is reducing the age of contest for a multi-billion Naira presidency to 35 when most of those in that age bracket are applicants for non-available jobs.The response should not be surprising. Capital flight first takes place. It goes to areas where adequate returns are still available. Finally a “brain drain” begins. Talented people leave the country for places that offer greater opportunity. The flight of capital, both real and human, further lowers standards of living. Signs of stagnation become more apparent. They may begin as seemingly benign as roads which have too many potholes. “For rent” signs are seen more frequently. Classified job ads decrease. “Going out of Business” sales are no longer marketing gimmicks.
Initially, people dig into their savings or begin to borrow in order to retain their standard of living. Most believe it is a temporary situation. Open and private begging take centre. Flesh sales also become common place.
2.The State
The State is threatened by a decline. Generally it moves into full pretend mode. Three behavioural traits characterise its behaviour. The State must convince citizens:
Things are not as bad as they seem.
The State is not responsible for the situation.
The State must do more (grow bigger) in order to solve the problems. Alhaji Lai Mohammed and colleagues have been doing a lot of these.
Statistics issued by the State are fudged to convey a false image of well-being. Just check inflationary figures and other dubious datas officialdom is churning out. Some officials are even telling us we are already exiting recession! Government spending soars in an effort to juice reported economic activity.We heard the Acting President telling us on “Democracy Day” that N1.2 trillion has been spent on infrastructure in two years without a project commissioned. Much of the spending is unproductive in terms of providing things that would have otherwise been bought.
It is also counterproductive to a proper functioning economy as price discovery is disrupted and consumer and investment decisions are based on false.
Bubbles occur and then burst. New bubbles are necessary to replace old bubbles. People and businesses are encouraged to make imprudent decisions, all in the attempt to make the economy appear better. All we are doing in Nigeria is to make it up!
The State has one objective and that is to remain in power. This explains the insensitivity in the land. Laws and regulations multiply at ever faster rates. Tyrannical rules and legislation are passed under the pretense of protecting the people against some threat. We have seen a lot of such impunity under the guise of some lousy anti-corruption war that has not done any dent on the corruption architecture. In reality, these actions are taken to protect the leaders against the public when they finally understand what has been done to them.
“Bread and circuses” increase to divert people’s attention from the developing problems. Dependency increases reflecting an attempt to placate the masses. This is where to situate school feeding and N5,000 “bail out” to the vulnerable. A “wag the dog” war or crisis is often used as a means to rally the public against some phony enemy.
1.Society
Society becomes coarsens as this process progresses. People increasingly are unable to provide properly for their families. We have read stories of parents exchanging their children for foodstuff . Some desperately turn to unethical behaviour, even criminal acts. Common decency declines.
The regulations imposed from above reduce the sphere of voluntary interactions between people. The government decides more and more what you must do, when and how you must do it. What you can say comes under attack. Finally how you must live is increasingly determined.
Society becomes increasingly divided in terms of the “makers” and the “takers.” As the takers grow in numbers, the makers shrink in numbers. Soon the parasites overwhelm the productive. Society collapses at that point.
Do people know?
Do people understand what is happening to them and their country? They are not aware of the full consequences. Most people are not trained to think in these terms, nor should they be. For most of us, it is a chore to get through each day. That is true of the dullards and the brilliant, for most of us end up at levels that task our abilities.
People sense there is something wrong even though they may be unable to identify what that something might be. Many probably believe that whatever is happening is temporary, sort of like an economic slowdown that reverts back to normal. For them, it is tighten the belt until the good times return.
But the bad news is that the good times are not going to return under these arrangements. Nigeria has entered a terminal crisis.The foundation of this structure has collapsed.The indolent culture of sharing oil rents from Niger Delta plus VAT and Port receipts from Lagos is sending this country on the death throes.
Yet, those who are benefitting from the iniquity that has sent millions of our citizens into misery are fiddling while Rome burns.They are using the rigged number in the National Assembly to muzzle devolution that should create nationwide prosperity and bring an end to the on-going strifes.
We asked for restructuring to return the country to what worked in the days of true federalism symbolised by the 1963 constitution.Those who asked for confederacy in 1953 and 1967 now say they don’t know what federalism means. May Nigeria not be in the graveyard before their understanding is opened.
The Yoruba say it is easy to wake a man who is asleep than the one feigning it.

Facebook Comments
SEE ALSO  Agege LG & Orile Agege LCDA Changed Lagos State Government Signed Order

1 Comment

  1. It is also counterproductive to a proper functioning economy as price discovery is disrupted and consumer and investment decisions are based on false.
    Bubbles occur and then burst. New bubbles are necessary to replace old bubbles. People and businesses are encouraged to make imprudent decisions, all in the attempt to make the economy appear better. All we are doing in Nigeria is to make it up!
    The State has one objective and that is to remain in power. This explains the insensitivity in the land. Laws and regulations multiply at ever faster rates. Tyrannical rules and legislation are passed under the pretense of protecting the people against some threat. We have seen a lot of such impunity under the guise of some lousy anti-corruption war that has not done any dent on the corruption architecture. In reality, these actions are taken to protect the leaders against the public when they finally understand what has been done to them.
    “Bread and circuses” increase to divert people’s attention from the developing problems. Dependency increases reflecting an attempt to placate the masses. This is where to situate school feeding and N5,000 “bail out” to the vulnerable. A “wag the dog” war or crisis is often used as a means to rally the public against some phony enemy.
    1.Society
    Society becomes coarsens as this process progresses. People increasingly are unable to provide properly for their families. We have read stories of parents exchanging their children for foodstuff . Some desperately turn to unethical behaviour, even criminal acts. Common decency declines.
    The regulations imposed from above reduce the sphere of voluntary interactions between people. The government decides more and more what you must do, when and how you must do it. What you can say comes under attack. Finally how you must live is increasingly determined.
    Society becomes increasingly divided in terms of the “makers” and the “takers.” As the takers grow in numbers, the makers shrink in numbers. Soon the parasites overwhelm the productive. Society collapses at that point.
    Do people know?
    Do people understand what is happening to them and their country? They are not aware of the full consequences. Most people are not trained to think in these terms, nor should they be. For most of us, it is a chore to get through each day. That is true of the dullards and the brilliant, for most of us end up at levels that task our abilities.
    People sense there is something wrong even though they may be unable to identify what that something might be. Many probably believe that whatever is happening is temporary, sort of like an economic slowdown that reverts back to normal. For them, it is tighten the belt until the good times return.
    But the bad news is that the good times are not going to return under these arrangements. Nigeria has entered a terminal crisis.The foundation of this structure has collapsed.The indolent culture of sharing oil rents from Niger Delta plus VAT and Port receipts from Lagos is sending this country on the death throes.
    Yet, those who are benefitting from the iniquity that has sent millions of our citizens into misery are fiddling while Rome burns.They are using the rigged number in the National Assembly to muzzle devolution that should create nationwide prosperity and bring an end to the on-going strifes.
    We asked for restructuring to return the country to what worked in the days of true federalism symbolised by the 1963 constitution.Those who asked for confederacy in 1953 and 1967 now say they don’t know what federalism means. May Nigeria not be in the graveyard before their understanding is opened.
    The Yoruba say it is easy to wake a man who is asleep than the one feigning it.

Leave a Reply